ScoSho: Another day, another fake conservative middle way

What about all these charging stations, how much is that going to cost? I mean if you have an electric car and you live in an apartment, are you going to run the extension cord down from your fourth floor window?

“I’ll tell you what – it’s not going to tow your trailer. It’s not going to tow your boat. It’s not going to get you out to your favourite camping spot with your family.”

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

– The Prime Minister ridicules electric vehicles during the 2019 election campaign. He claimed yesterday that his latest never-never ‘plan’ is about “choices not mandates.” As we have seen, however, when he touts “choices not mandates,” he means no genuine choice, all mandates. Bill Shorten is justifiably flattered.

This entry was posted in COVID hysteria, Left-wing extremism. Bookmark the permalink.

23 Responses to ScoSho: Another day, another fake conservative middle way

  1. C.L. says:

    Scott Morrison’s electric vehicle strategy – a key plank of the government’s target for net-zero emissions by 2050 – will accelerate the rollout of charging and ­hydrogen refuelling stations across the country to support 1.7 million electric cars on the road by 2030.

    As car manufacturers release timelines to end production of conventional vehicles, the Prime Minister said the government’s strategy would not force Australians out of their family sedans, utes and trucks.

    Mr Morrison, who accused Bill Shorten of “ending the weekend” as the Coalition weaponised Labor’s electric vehicle strategy at the 2019 election, will spend $250m building charging stations in cities and towns and supporting businesses and ­governments transition to electric fleets.

    The Future Fuels strategy – to be released on Tuesday and ­expected to drive more than $500m in combined private and public co-investment – is forecast to help slash carbon emissions by more than 8 million tonnes by 2035 and avoid $224m in electricity network upgrade costs.

    Driving down transport emissions is considered crucial to achieving carbon neutrality by mid-century, with the government planning to create more than 2600 jobs through the construction of charging infrastructure across 400 businesses, 50,000 households and 1000 public-­access fast-charging stations. New public charging stations would be accessed by up to 84 per cent of the population, covering about 21 million people, and ­reduce health costs by $200m to 2035.

    Mr Morrison said the Future Fuels plan was designed to avoid taxes and offer “choices not mandates” as electric vehicle prices fall in line with demand.

    “Australians love their family sedan, farmers rely on their ­trusted ute and our economy counts on trucks and trains to deliver goods from coast to coast,” Mr Morrison said.

    “We will not be forcing Australians out of the car they want to drive or penalising those who can least afford it through bans or taxes. The strategy will work to drive down the cost of low- and zero-emission vehicles, and ­enhance consumer choice.

    “We will do this by creating the right environment for industry co-­investment in technology ­development.”

    Mr Morrison said he believed Australians would embrace electric vehicles when they became “cost competitive”, leading to similar world-leading uptake rates as occurred with rooftop solar.

    The federal government has come under pressure from Britain, the European Union and the US to adopt more ambitious electric vehicle targets, after Boris ­Johnson announced new petrol and diesel cars would be banned from 2030.

    Amid concerns inside the ­Nationals partyroom over accelerated electric vehicle take-up and the hit to fuel-excise revenue, the government is focusing investment in public electric vehicle charging and hydrogen refuelling infrastructure, heavy and long-distance vehicle fleets, light commercial fleets and household smart charging.

    Energy Minister Angus Taylor, who released the Future Fuels discussion paper in February, will bring forward a package of market reforms to state and territory governments, to ensure the electricity grid is EV-ready.

    Mr Taylor, who travelled with Mr Morrison to the COP26 summit in Glasgow last week, said the development of low-emissions vehicles and future fuel technologies, backed by $2.1bn in government support, would “over time … reshape the way we drive”.

    “Australians are already making this choice as prices continue to fall,” Mr Taylor said. “For example, the Electric Vehicle Council has reported 8688 battery electric vehicle and plug-in hybrid sales in the first six months of 2021, which is 26 per cent higher than the whole of 2020. In the last eight months there has been a 20 per cent increase in the number of low emissions vehicle models available in Australia.”

    Registrations of electric vehicles have surged, almost doubling to 23,000 this year, with hybrid vehicle sales pushing past 60,000.

    The Future Fuels strategy says “battery electric and plug-in ­hybrid electric vehicles are projected to make up 30 per cent of annual new passenger and light commercial vehicle sales in Australia by 2030”.

    “This translates to over 1.7 million battery electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles on Australian roads by 2030,” it says. “By enabling this increased uptake, the expanded Future Fuels Fund is expected to reduce emissions by 8Mt of CO2 equivalent by 2035.”

    Mr Taylor said the ­technology-led electric vehicle plan would ensure “Australians can drive their preferred type of vehicle – be that petrol, diesel, hydrogen or electric powered”.

    “Voluntary adoption of electric vehicles is the right pathway for reducing transport emissions over the long-term,” he said. “Stringent standards, bans or regressive taxes will limit choice and increase the upfront costs of cars from Australians.”

    The Future Fuels strategy outlines the need for close collaboration between governments to “consider the road-related revenue implications of new technology vehicles”. The Australian understands the federal government has monitored moves by some state governments to pursue new road-user charges, countering lost fuel excise revenue.

    The electric vehicle strategy, first flagged in January 2018 by then energy minister Josh ­Frydenberg, says the key to lowering prices of low-and-zero emissions vehicles and enhancing consumer choice was reducing costs in manufacturing lithium-ion batteries.

    The Department of Industry, Science, Energy and Resources report said the price for lithium-ion batteries had “dropped by over 89 per cent since 2010 and is expected to fall to half of the current price by 2030”.

    ————-
    By Geoff Chambers, The Australian.

  2. a reader says:

    and this one was self-inflicted. The bushfires was a beat-up. This is deserved

  3. Lee says:

    The question is, is this the real ScoMo that he has managed to hide from the public until fairly recently, or has he been gotten at?
    Either way, he is a contemptible example of a so-called Liberal P.M.

    There is no getting around it (and any half-decent electrical engineer will tell you this), despite all the BS and waffle coming from Angus Taylor and others, to replace every petrol or diesel-driven vehicle in Australia will require absolutely vast amounts of electricity, far more than we are using now.
    We are not going to get that extra supply of electricity from solar panels, wind turbines, and unicorn farts.
    And that’s not even counting the enormous expenditure for all the extra infrastructure essential for an all electric vehicle society.

  4. Not Trampis says:

    A couple of myths about EVs.
    They drive more in Europe and the UK than here. we use planes.

    Very easy to charge the car during the night when there is little demand and you do not have to charge it every night.
    And Morrison was wrong about almost everything he said about them.

    Two easy ways to reduce emissions here. Reduce the taxes on EVS and bring in some decent d standards on petrol cars. We deasil have the worst policy because we have no policy.

  5. Chris M says:

    The slime is oozing along the road with his signature smirk. Destroying a country, a political party and the whole image of conservatism feels good apparently.

  6. Boambee John says:

    Non Compos Mentis

    They drive more in Europe and the UK than here. we use planes.

    Urfban bugman alert!

    Very easy to charge the car during the night when there is little demand and you do not have to charge it every night.

    Particularly on a windless night, after the number of coal powered generators declines below the level needed for the base load. Just hop on your bicycle, and connect the generator for the light to the car battery, and get your daily exercise.

    Two easy ways to reduce emissions here

    Nuclear power or a perpetual motion machine.

    Stick to theorising about banking. You will look less stupid.

  7. Lee says:

    Very easy to charge the car during the night when there is little demand and you do not have to charge it every night.

    Yeah, sure, when hundreds of thousands – no, literally millions of people – are doing it at exactly the same time.
    That will bring the grid crashing down very quick smart.
    Electrical engineers are quite emphatic on this; if everyone has only electric cars the power grid will never cope with the massive extra demands on it.
    But as usual, your ignorance is very profound.

  8. jupes says:

    slash carbon emissions by more than 8 million tonnes by 2035
    avoid $224m in electricity network upgrade costs
    create more than 2600 jobs
    construction of charging infrastructure across 400 businesses, 50,000 households and 1000 public-­access fast-charging stations
    New public charging stations would be accessed by up to 84 per cent of the population reduce health costs by $200m to 2035.

    Get a load of this plan will you. Pure unadulterated fantasy. Just fucking stop now you cretins.

  9. Tel says:

    Build more charging stations, thus using less electricity … an idea so crazy it just might work … if we were living in a comic book and the pages were flipping too fast for anyone to read closely.

    Very easy to charge the car during the night when there is little demand and you do not have to charge it every night.

    Given that solar power is utterly free … might as well charge it every night! You know you want to.

  10. WolfmanOz (just existing in Melb. now) says:

    Scumo is a f**king disgrace.

    His betrayal of his base is unforgivable.

  11. Ed Case says:

    despite all the BS and waffle coming from Angus Taylor and others, to replace every petrol or diesel-driven vehicle in Australia will require absolutely vast amounts of electricity, far more than we are using now.

    The proposal is there are 1.7 million electric vehicles on the road by 2030.
    I’m thinking that’s achievabloe.

  12. Eyrie says:

    There’s your mistake, Ed. You think you are thinking.

  13. Lee says:

    The proposal is there are 1.7 million electric vehicles on the road by 2030.
    I’m thinking that’s achievabloe.

    As any electrical engineer will tell you, “you’re dreaming!”
    In any case, there would need to be hundreds of recharge stations around Australia at a minimum.
    So far as I know, not one has been built.

  14. Ed Case says:

    How hard is it to build a recharge Station?
    There’s a powerpole every 50 yards on every street in Australia.

  15. Boambee John says:

    Not hard to build a recharge station.

    Ensuring that the simultaneous use of lots of them close together doesn’t overload the circuit? Not quite so easy.

  16. RacerX says:

    Voluntary adoption of electric vehicles is the right pathway for reducing transport emissions over the long-term,” 

    Why do I suspect this will be as voluntary as the covid vaccines.

  17. Not Trampis says:

    actually you can easily charge you car at night. It would not be needed every night!! Please understand the topic.
    As SA shows there is plenty of power at night and the ‘target’ is modest and won’t occur unless more stringent car emission target are enacted.
    EVs are no two machines. That is they can charged but they can also put power back into the system or your house or business. Happening now in Newcastle with garbage trucks.

  18. Boambee John says:

    Non Compos Mentis again displays his absolute and total ignorance of anything involving technology and engineering.

    Has Non Compos Mentis lived the dream? Has he installed solar panels and a battery in his house, and bought an EV? More importantly, did he then cut his house off from the eeeevvvilll carbon emitting national grid, and live purely on ruinables?

  19. a reader says:

    Why do I, an Australian tax payer, have to pay for the refuelling infrastructure for a collection of rich inner city wankers who want to preen about their truly awful Tesla shitbox? The government didn’t set up the infrastructure that I use to refuel my car after all

  20. Ed Case says:

    Ensuring that the simultaneous use of lots of them close together doesn’t overload the circuit? Not quite so easy.

    I’m thinking there’s technology that will prevent overloading by car chargers.
    And it’s only 1.7 million vehicle in 9 years time.
    There’s way more than 1.7 million vehicles in Brisbane and the fuel comes by ship from Singapore, but I haven’t had any trouble filling up the Morris Oxford in the last 45 years,

  21. Bushkid says:

    Lee says:
    9 November, 2021 at 1:09 pm
    The question is, is this the real ScoMo that he has managed to hide from the public until fairly recently, or has he been gotten at?
    Either way, he is a contemptible example of a so-called Liberal P.M.

    There is no getting around it (and any half-decent electrical engineer will tell you this), despite all the BS and waffle coming from Angus Taylor and others, to replace every petrol or diesel-driven vehicle in Australia will require absolutely vast amounts of electricity, far more than we are using now.
    We are not going to get that extra supply of electricity from solar panels, wind turbines, and unicorn farts.
    And that’s not even counting the enormous expenditure for all the extra infrastructure essential for an all electric vehicle society.

    1. It’s always been the same ScoMo, he just almost hid it from the beginning. He’s good at following instructions, e.g. in charge of “stoping the boats” under the direction of Abbott. He’s now following instructions from overseas – Why else would the PM of an obscure nation from the bottom of the globe be invited to the sidelines of the G7? There seemed to be a distinct uptick in his enthusiasm for all things covid control after he dog home from that shindig. Also, his caving in prior to the COP26 knees-up.

    2. The only way the “transition” to wind and solar, with a bit of back up from our meagre supply of hydro, can possibly supply the electricity needs of the country is if the population was to be literally decimated. Or even further reduced than that.

    Most of the dreamers simply do not understand that. They believe that the solar and wind generation can magically continue to provide the power to maintain their current lifestyles. Patsies and useful idiots.

    The dangerous ones are those who do fully understand how far short the “renewables” will fall, yet are ploughing on regardless. They’ll either kill millions by removing and not replacing the baseload capacity of the (coal- and gas-fired) electricity that currently enables normal, safe, hygienic, well-lit, functioning life, or they’ll let some other means do so. Enter a virus and its “miracle” jab.

  22. Boambee John says:

    Mr Ed

    I’m thinking there’s technology that will prevent overloading by car chargers.

    There is. It’s called the circuit breaker. It throws out complete areas, not just a single charge point. Just like it throws out your whole house, not just one power point.

    Let me remind you of what I wrote for Non Compos Mentis/Not Trampis earlier yesterday.

    Non Compos Mentis again displays his absolute and total ignorance of anything involving technology and engineering.

    Has Non Compos Mentis lived the dream? Has he installed solar panels and a battery in his house, and bought an EV? More importantly, did he then cut his house off from the eeeevvvilll carbon emitting national grid, and live purely on ruinables?

    I look forward to your report on the success of your independent living scheme. Twelve months should be a good trial period.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.